This Site Ranks Youth Hockey Teams, Even for 9-Year-Olds

It was after midnight in the center of a November week, and Neil Lodin, the founder of MYHockey Rankings, was hunched around a personal computer in his sparsely furnished household place of work, feeding the beast.

The results of extra than 10,000 youth hockey video games had arrive in around the weekend and awaited acceptance. Lodin wanted to delete duplicates, take care of complaints and check out for statistical anomalies. Most of all, he had to rank teams.

Lodin, 54, toiled in suburban Indianapolis. His son, Ian Lodin, 27, experienced been getting ready the internet site for several hours from his condominium 360 miles absent in Pittsburgh. They labored in silence, help save for the clacking of their keyboards, to update their weekly rankings of approximately 13,000 touring youth hockey groups spanning age groups from 9 to 18.

By dawn on Wednesday, throngs of youth hockey coaches, moms and dads and gamers would be on line, keen for what the Lodins would serve up.

“There are people today all over the nation who chat about they or their youngsters receiving up on Wednesday mornings and examining the rankings,” explained Neil Lodin, a previous pc programmer who created the algorithm that powers his internet site.

MYHockey Rankings — now as a great deal a section of North American youth hockey as warm chocolate and hand heaters — has been called a salvation by coaches who depend on it to assistance them program games towards teams at about the exact amount of talent. Scouts use it to detect groups to look at.

Detractors, including a blogger who named MYHockey Rankings “the worst web page for youth hockey … ever,” complain that the rankings gas the parent-pushed lifestyle of the sport and emphasize successful above player enhancement.

“These rankings are as close to biblical as you can maybe get on a youth hockey scale,” reported Sean Green, who coaches a squirt team (9- and 10-year-olds) for the Allegheny Badgers exterior Pittsburgh. Still, he said, the rankings can be damaging. “Development need to be important, but the problem is as soon

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UMD alumna is first female to run youth mentorship, after-school programming foundation

By Angel Gingras
For The Diamondback

Two University of Maryland alumna are working to improve the lives of students in the Washington, D.C., area through mentorship and after-school programming at the Youth Leadership Foundation.

Janaiha Bennett is an alumna of this university and the executive director of the Youth Leadership Foundation in Washington, D.C., which provides mentoring to students from third to 12th grade who live in underrepresented communities. She is the first female to hold this position in the organization’s 24-year history.

“The relationships that are created between the students and the staff are really deep-seated … you just bond, and so it is sort of a family and a community” Bennett said. “So essentially what we do is give students the tools they need to fulfill their potential as a human being.”

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YLF is a year-round program open to students in any of the organization’s seven partner schools in Washington, D.C., Maryland and Virginia. Students can take part in after-school or weekend programs during the school year or in the five-week summer camp as often as they want. This fall, the staff is running an in-person program with the option for students to attend virtually.

Bennett was first introduced to YLF when she was an undergraduate student at George Washington University. She joined other college students and began mentoring young women, working her way up through various program roles, until she became executive director in 2018.

Bennett was also at YLF when she graduated with her master’s degree in school psychology from this university in 2013, which she said contributes to the work she does at YLF.

“I learned a lot about working with individual students and how to work with teachers so that they can help students,” Bennett said. “It was a really great experience.”

Kayla Montgomery, also an alumna, began her mentorship with the organization when she was a sophomore at this university. She graduated with a degree in criminology and criminal justice in 2020.

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