Massive Rogers outage affected Canadian phones, internet, ATMs, and debit cards

Canadian telecom Rogers is suffering a major outage affecting landline phones, cellular connections, and internet connectivity throughout Canada that started early this morning. Downdetector listed thousands of reports for the issues that flooded in as people started to get up around 5AM ET and couldn’t get online.

Rogers first addressed the outage in a tweet from its official support account just before 9AM ET and then went silent for a couple of hours. On Friday afternoon, the company tweeted that its technical teams are working to restore services “alongside our global technology partners, and are making progress.”

Late Friday evening, Rogers CEO & President Tony Staffieri posted a letter to Canadians on the company website.

Dear Canadians,

We know you count on Rogers to connect you to emergency services, make payments, serve your customers, connect with work and keep in touch with friends and family. We take that responsibility very seriously and today we let you down. We can and will do better.

As you know, we experienced a network outage across both wireless and wireline service that began early this morning.

We have made meaningful progress towards bringing our networks back online and many of our wireless customers are starting to see services return. We don’t yet have an ETA on when our networks will be fully restored but will we continue to share information with our customers as we restore full service.

We know going a full day without connectivity has real impacts on our customers, and all Canadians. On behalf of all of us here at Rogers, Rogers for Business, Fido, chatr and cityfone, I want to sincerely apologize for this service interruption and the impact it is having on people from coast to coast to coast.

As our teams continue working to resolve the situation, I want to make two commitments to you:

First, we are working to fully understand the root cause of this outage and we will make all the changes necessary to ensure that in the future we meet and exceed your expectations for our networks.

Second, we will make this right for

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Yes, ISPs Really Can Throttle Your Internet Connection, Making Wi-Fi Slower

This story is part of Home Tips, CNET’s collection of practical advice for getting the most out of your home, inside and out.

If you’re experiencing frustratingly slow internet speeds, the culprit could be an outdated router or a less-than-ideal router location. Your connection issues could require an easy fix, like upgrading to a mesh network or simply restarting your modem and router. But if you’ve already attempted many of the tried-and-true methods and your internet speeds are still subpar, the issue might be due to something your internet service provider is intentionally doing: bandwidth throttling.

CNET Home Tips logo

Yes, you read that right. Your ISP could be making your Wi-Fi slower on purpose. Resulting from the 2019 Supreme Court decision declining to hear an appeal on net neutrality, ISPs can still legally stifle your internet, limiting your broadband if you’re streaming more TV than they want and serving slower connections to websites owned by their competitors. 

One solution to slow Wi-Fi (if it is caused by internet throttling) is a virtual private network
. Basically, ISPs need to see your IP address to slow down your internet, and a good VPN will shield that identity — though it comes with some limitations and downsides, which I’ll discuss below. We’ll walk you through how to tell if throttling is to blame and, if not, what to do about fixing your crummy Wi-Fi. (You can also learn more about how to get free Wi-Fi anywhere in the world.) 

Read more: Best Internet Providers of 2022

Step 1

First, troubleshoot your slow internet connection

So your Wi-Fi is slow and you think your service provider is throttling your connection. Before you jump to those conclusions, it’s important to run through the usual troubleshooting list: Check that your router is centrally located in your home, reposition its antennas, double-check your network security and so on. If you want to read about more ways to optimize your Wi-Fi, check out our suggestions.

If you’ve run through the laundry list and your Wi-Fi is still chugging slowly, move on to the next step.

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Please Check Your Internet Connection [FIXED]

Blizzard Entertainment has just come out with the latest entry in the Diablo franchise and it’s measuring to be one doozy of an RPG. However, certain issues—more precisely bugs and errors—aren’t letting dungeon-crawling enthusiasts enjoy the title as it should be. One of these pertinent problems is Diablo Immortal please check your internet connection that bars players from connecting to online servers. 

If you’ve been affected by a similar issue, you’re definitely not alone in this endeavor. Thousands of other players currently face the same calamity with no straight solution in mind.

However, the good news is that the affair isn’t entirely impossible to get the better of. Plenty of potential fixes seem to be working for the hack-and-slash RPG, so it’s not too bad of a situation. Let us get right into these measures with no further ado. 

What is Diablo Immortal Please Check Your Internet Connection? 

Diablo Immortal Please Check Your Internet Connection

Diablo Immortal is a pretty fun game that puts even the most hardcore RPG fans to its paces. However, in times that it’s not fun at all, you’re probably looking at an error screen, such as the one in question. What we have at our disposal here is purely an internet-centric issue that doesn’t seem to go away on its own unless, of course, you do something about it. 

As soon as you start up your game in the instance of these dire times, the title screen returns you with a prompt that says, “Please check your internet connection and tap OK.” Selecting the latter then takes you back to your phone’s home screen thereby shutting the game down from what we can gather. This is undesirable in every sense of the meaning, so concerned players do need to fix the issue promptly to get back to demon hunting. 

Fortunately, the situation isn’t all that oh-so-terrible. Whether you’re facing the problem on your Android or iOS device or on Blizzard’s Battle.net launcher, we’ve outlined a variety of different potential solutions. Implementing the latter correctly on your end will more or less ensure that

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How to Connect Raspberry Pi Pico W to the Internet

The release of the Raspberry Pi Pico W brings with it an interesting opportunity. In the past if we wanted to connect a Raspberry Pi to the world, we would need one of the larger models. The Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W, and Raspberry Pi 4 were often pressed into data collection duties. The Raspberry Pi 4 is a bit of a power hog, the Zero 2 W is a bit better but still overkill for a simple information project.

With the arrival of the Raspberry Pi Pico W we have a low power, microcontroller with a competent Wi-Fi chip, in the Pico form factor and only $6! 

So where do we start? How do we get our Raspberry Pi Pico W online, and where can we find interesting data to collect? Let us guide you through making the most of your $6 Raspberry Pi Pico W.

Getting the Raspberry Pi Pico W Online

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

The Raspberry Pi Pico W comes with an Infineon CYW43439 2.4 GHz Wi-Fi chip and onboard antenna. This means we get good Wi-Fi reception without the need for lots of wires. We’re using the latest MicroPython release for the Pico W as it offers the easiest means to get online and do fun projects.

1. Setup your Raspberry Pi Pico W by following our getting started guide. You will need to install MicroPython on your Pico W before you can proceed further.

2. Open the Thonny editor to a blank document.

3. Create an object called SSID and in it store the SSID of your Wi-Fi access point.

SSID = "YOUR WIFI AP"

4. Create an object called PASSWORD and store your Wi-Fi password.

PASSWORD = "TRUSTNO1"

5. Save the file to the Raspberry Pi Pico W as secrets.py By storing our sensitive details in a secrets file, we can freely share the project code with friends, or online. Just remember not to share the secrets file too.

6. Click on New File to create a new blank document.

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

7. Import three modules of code, network,

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The Internet of Things is Watching You

Episode Notes

Billions of devices are now internet-connected and collecting data at a prodigious rate, and there seems to be no end to the development of smart things we didn’t know we needed. With data being collected by everything from your refrigerator to your toothbrush… is your privacy at risk? Dennis and Tom discuss how internet of things devices track information about us, how to live life with that in mind, and what new and existing privacy laws do to give us an understanding of the extent of data-gathering going on around us.

Later, it’s been quite a few years now, but how much do you really know about what Dennis and Tom do in the real world? They guys each give an update on their professional lives and current projects.

As always, stay tuned for the parting shots, that one tip, website, or observation that you can use the second the podcast ends.

Have a technology question for Dennis and Tom? Call their Tech Question Hotline at 720-441-6820 for the answers to your most burning tech questions.

Special thanks to our
sponsors , , and .

Transcript

Tom Mighell: Before we get started, we’d like to thank our sponsors Embroker, Clio and Posh Virtual Receptionists.

[Music]

Intro: Web 2.0 Innovation, Trends, Collaboration, Software, Metadata, Software Service, Podcasts, Virtual Law. Got the world turning as fast as it can, hear how technology can help. Legally speaking, with two of the top legal technology experts, authors, and lawyers, Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell. Welcome to The Kennedy-Mighell Report, here on the Legal Talk Network.

Dennis Kennedy: Welcome to episode 316 of the Kennedy-Mighell Report. I’m Dennis Kennedy in Ann Arbor.

Tom Mighell: I’m Tom Mighell in Dallas. 

Dennis Kennedy: In our last episode, we took an up-to-date look at home offices, some new ideas and trends, and what works best these days. And that was before I learned I learned about Steel Case’s upcoming new line of Frank Lloyd Wright inspired office furniture. In this episode, we look at the rapidly growing Internet of things, especially what all these sensors are

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One Direction teenage fangirls created the internet as we know it

You’ve seen the images: grainy black-and-white shots of teenagers, mostly girls, crying, screaming, flailing their arms across blockades as police officers try in vain to hold them back. In photos, they look pained, ecstatic, desperate, devoted. The term that came to describe the phenomenon alluded to the irrationality of it all: Beatlemania.

Fifty years later, another British boy band landed in America with a fervor that appeared quite similar: One Direction. In that time, the nature of fandom evolved dramatically thanks to the internet, which enabled people to come together who only shared one thing in common, people to whom it was the most important thing in their lives. Beyond that, though, the fans who populated the internet also played a key role in creating it: the conventions, the language, the mob mindset, the memes.

Macmillan

That’s the subject of Kaitlyn Tiffany’s debut nonfiction book, Everything I Need I Get from You: How Fangirls Created the Internet as We Know It, which acts as an ethnography of stan culture through the lens of a One Direction superfan. Tiffany (who, disclosure, was previously a reporter at Vox) provides nuanced analysis of an often-overlooked force in internet history, one dominated by the kind of young women whom the rest of the world dismissed as little more than brainless teenyboppers. We recently chatted over the phone about the experience of writing the book, fandom’s fraught relationship with capitalism, and what the act of screaming for your fave can do.

“There are no girls on the internet” was a common axiom on 2000s-era message boards, but clearly that is not and was never the case. What were women doing on the early internet, and why were they less visible?

There was obviously a gender gap in the early days of the web, but it started closing much earlier than people think. Around 2000 is when researchers started noticing that women, and especially younger women, weren’t using it in the transactional or goal-oriented ways that men were using it for work or promotion, but as a social tool. The internet was a lot more

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