Yes, Your Router Collects Data on You. Here’s How to Protect Your Privacy

This story is part of Home Tips, CNET’s collection of practical advice for getting the most out of your home, inside and out.

Your home’s Wi-Fi router is the central hub of your home internet network, which means that all of the traffic from all of the Wi-Fi devices under your roof passes through it on its way to the cloud. That’s a lot of data — enough so to make privacy a reasonable point of concern when you’re picking one out.

The problem is that it’s next to impossible for the average consumer to glean very much about the privacy practices of the companies that make and sell routers. Data-collection practices are complicated to begin with, and most privacy policies do a poor job of shedding light on them. Working up the will to read through the lengthy legal-speak that fills them is no small task for a single manufacturer, let alone several of them. Even if you make it that far, you’re likely to end up with more questions than answers.

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Fortunately, I have a strong stomach for fine print, and after spending the last few years testing and reviewing routers here on CNET, most manufacturers tend to respond to my emails when I have questions. So, I set out to dig into the details of what these routers are doing with your data — here’s what I found. (You can also find out why your Wi-Fi router may be in the wrong spot, and where to find the best internet speed tests.) 

All of the problems with privacy policies

I combed through about 30,000 words of terms of use and other policy documents as I tried to find answers for this post — but privacy policies typically aren’t written with full transparency in mind.

“All a privacy policy can really do is tell you with some confidence that something bad is not going to happen,” said Bennett Cyphers, a staff technologist with the

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Here’s How to Find All Your Wi-Fi Passwords on Your Mac and Windows

You should never use the same password more than once, but using so many different passwords can make it difficult to remember all of them. If you don’t write them down somewhere, you may never remember certain passwords again, including the one for your Wi-Fi network.

Usually your Wi-Fi password should be printed on the back of your router, but if it’s not, don’t sweat it. There’s another way to find the passwords to all of the Wi-Fi networks you’ve ever connected to. They’re all on your computer somewhere.

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As long as your Windows or Mac computer has connected to that network before, the Wi-Fi password is permanently stored in your settings. It may require a bit of digging on your part, but all of the passwords are there, saved and ready to be shared with anyone who wants to connect to Wi-Fi.

Here’s how to find the passwords to all of the Wi-Fi networks you’ve ever connected to on MacOS and Windows. For more, discover 17 essential settings for customizing your MacBook or how to get the most out of Windows 11.

How to find Wi-Fi passwords in MacOS

Every password you’ve entered and saved on a Mac is stored in Keychain Access, the password management system for MacOS. And that includes Wi-Fi network passwords. 

To start, use the search feature to open the Keychain Access app and do the following:

1. Click on System under System Keychains in the sidebar.

2. Next, click on Passwords at the top of the window.

3. Find the Wi-Fi network you want the password for and double-click on it.

4. Finally, check the box next to Show password and enter your password when prompted.

Keychain Access app pop-up on MacBook

Find all your stored Wi-Fi passwords in the Keychain Access app on MacOS.


Screenshot by Nelson Aguilar/CNET

The password field will then show the password you used to log in to that Wi-Fi network. You can double-click in the password field to select the password and copy it to your clipboard, if needed.

How to find Wi-Fi passwords on Windows

Finding the

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Here’s the best gaming accessory deals in Amazon’s Logitech Week

If you’re looking to make some upgrades to your gaming setup, now is a good time because it is currently Logitech week over at Amazon.

Between the 20th and 26th of February there are discounts on all sorts of Logitech gaming accessories including mice, keyboards, headsets, racing wheels and more. Astro headsets also feature in the discounts for even more audio options.

We’ve picked out a few of our favourite deals on offer in Amazon’s Logitech Week, but make sure you check out the full list of discounts here to help you find what you’re looking for.

Logitech G Pro wireless gaming mouse


The G Pro wireless is one of the most popular gaming mice around, thanks to its sleek ambidextrous design that packs in a big battery and only weighs 80g. You also get Logitech’s Hero 25K Sensor that delivers 25600 DPI tracking and can also exceed 400 IPS. It’s currently on sale for £76, a good price for the quality of mouse you’re getting and the lowest price it’s been this year.

Buy the Logitech G Pro gaming mouse for £76 from Amazon (Was £120)

Logitech G915 TKL wireless keyboard


If you want to pair the G Pro wireless with a new wireless keyboard, the G915 is a great option. As a tenkeyless keyboard you get the function keys, arrow keys and home keys but save the space of the numpad so you’ve got more room on your desk to swing that mouse around. The G915 features fast low-profile mechanical keys, and lightspeed wireless connectivity to match that speed so you won’t lag behind the competition.

Buy the Logitech G915 gaming keyboard for £160 from Amazon (Was £220)

Logitech G533 wireless gaming headset


Of course, you’ll need to hear all of the games you’re playing, so it’s good to see the Logitech G533 Wireless Gaming headset on sale too. This headset is down to £85 and for that price you get 7.1 Surround Sound through the 40 mm Pro-G Drivers, a 15 hour battery life, and a clear noise-cancelling microphone that can easily flip out of the

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Your Router Is in the Wrong Spot. Here’s Where To Move It for Faster Wi-Fi

This story is part of Home Tips, CNET’s collection of practical advice for getting the most out of your home, inside and out.

A reliable internet connection at home is pivotal — but Wi-Fi can be frustratingly finicky. Despite paying monthly fees to an internet service provider, and even if you’ve had a router professionally installed, you may still find yourself spending too much time watching your phone, laptop or streaming device grind away as it tries to stay connected. 

That’s a massive headache if you work from home, if you’re trying to install smart home gadgets, or if you just want to unwind with some Netflix at the end of the day.

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The good news is there’s an easy way to optimize your Wi-Fi network and address these issues, and it’ll only take you a few minutes. 

There are a lot of factors that determine internet speeds and while there are a few tricks or guidelines you can follow to improve the overall wireless speeds and coverage in your home, one of the most crucial factors is the location of your router. And note, the best place is not always where the technician set it up. So keep reading to learn about the best place in your home for your router and other tricks for faster Wi-Fi. You can also check out our picks for the best Wi-Fi routers, the best mesh routers and the best Wi-Fi extenders.

Find the right router for your space

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First things first: It all starts with choosing the right router or other equipment. Not all routers are the same and the size and layout of your home will determine what type of wireless network you need.

For most apartments and smaller homes (under 1,500 square feet), a single wireless access point should suffice. That said, if your router is several years old, you may want to consider upgrading to a newer model with support for 802.11ax, or Wi-Fi

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All Those Wi-Fi Passwords You Used Can be Recovered. Here’s How

When you originally set up your home Wi-Fi network, you likely didn’t give your password much thought after connecting your phone and laptop to the internet. That is, until a friend or family member arrives and wants access to your Wi-Fi.

And maybe you don’t remember the password, and didn’t write it down. Is it that super long number on the back of your router? Or did you change it to something more personal?

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Lucky for you, there’s a way to find all your Wi-Fi passwords in a single place — your computer.

Read more: Best Password Managers for 2022

As long as your Windows or Mac computer has connected to the network before, that Wi-Fi password is permanently stored in your settings. It may require a bit of digging on your part, but all of the passwords are there, saved, and ready to be shared with anyone who wants to connect to Wi-Fi.

Here’s how to find the passwords to all of the Wi-Fi networks you’ve ever connected to on MacOS and Windows. For more, discover 17 essential settings for customizing your MacBook or how to get the most out of Windows 11.

How to find Wi-Fi passwords in MacOS

Every password you’ve entered and saved on a Mac is stored in Keychain Access, the password management system for MacOS. And that includes Wi-Fi network passwords. 

To start, use the search feature to open the Keychain Access app and do the following:

1. Click on System under System Keychains in the sidebar.

2. Next, click on Passwords at the top of the window.

3. Find the Wi-Fi network you want the password for and double-click on it.

4. Finally, check the box next to Show password and enter your password when prompted.

Keychain Access app pop-up on MacBook

Find all your stored Wi-Fi passwords in the Keychain Access app on MacOS.


Screenshot by Nelson Aguilar/CNET

The password field will then show the password you used to log in to that Wi-Fi network. You can double-click in the password field to select the password and copy it to your clipboard,

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Wordle Top secret Phrase Match Has Taken the World wide web by Storm: Here’s How to Engage in

Wordle is an quick-to-study and entertaining-to-play on line activity that has garnered a good deal of consideration as most of us are nonetheless yet again limited to our houses due to the increasing Omicron situations and dipping temperatures. To participate in Wordle, you want to achieve a very simple process: guess a mystery 5-letter term in 6 tries. When the procedures of the recreation are uncomplicated, what makes it intriguing and hard is the actuality that a man or woman can only participate in the video game at the time a working day. Wordle can be only performed by means of a web site and won’t have to have you to obtain an app and indication in with any type of qualifications. This is all you will need to know about Wordle:

Wordle: Meet up with the maker

The recreation has been formulated by Josh Wardle, a Brooklyn-dependent software package engineer. The tale guiding the game’s advancement is as exciting as the sport. Wardle knew his partner, Palak Shah, liked online games, so he designed a guessing recreation for just the two of them. He named it “Wordle,” participating in on his last name. Wardle played it with Shah for a pair of months and shared it on his family’s WhatsApp team, wherever it promptly grew to become an obsession.

Wardle first designed a prototype of the game in 2013 but his mates were being unimpressed by his creation so he abandoned the notion. In 2020, on the other hand, he and Shah commenced killing time all through the pandemic by participating in Wordle. Wardle instructed the New York Instances in an job interview that limiting the probability to enjoy the activity only once for every working day “enforced a feeling of scarcity.” Wardle explained, “It’s something that encourages you to devote 3 minutes a day. And, which is it. Like, it isn’t going to want any extra of your time than that.”

Wordle: First Release

The developer released Wordle for the relaxation of the planet in Oct very last 12 months by building a focused web page for it.

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