Your Router Is in the Wrong Spot. Here’s Where To Move It for Faster Wi-Fi

This story is part of Home Tips, CNET’s collection of practical advice for getting the most out of your home, inside and out.

A reliable internet connection at home is pivotal — but Wi-Fi can be frustratingly finicky. Despite paying monthly fees to an internet service provider, and even if you’ve had a router professionally installed, you may still find yourself spending too much time watching your phone, laptop or streaming device grind away as it tries to stay connected. 

That’s a massive headache if you work from home, if you’re trying to install smart home gadgets, or if you just want to unwind with some Netflix at the end of the day.

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The good news is there’s an easy way to optimize your Wi-Fi network and address these issues, and it’ll only take you a few minutes. 

There are a lot of factors that determine internet speeds and while there are a few tricks or guidelines you can follow to improve the overall wireless speeds and coverage in your home, one of the most crucial factors is the location of your router. And note, the best place is not always where the technician set it up. So keep reading to learn about the best place in your home for your router and other tricks for faster Wi-Fi. You can also check out our picks for the best Wi-Fi routers, the best mesh routers and the best Wi-Fi extenders.

Find the right router for your space

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First things first: It all starts with choosing the right router or other equipment. Not all routers are the same and the size and layout of your home will determine what type of wireless network you need.

For most apartments and smaller homes (under 1,500 square feet), a single wireless access point should suffice. That said, if your router is several years old, you may want to consider upgrading to a newer model with support for 802.11ax, or Wi-Fi

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All Those Wi-Fi Passwords You Used Can be Recovered. Here’s How

When you originally set up your home Wi-Fi network, you likely didn’t give your password much thought after connecting your phone and laptop to the internet. That is, until a friend or family member arrives and wants access to your Wi-Fi.

And maybe you don’t remember the password, and didn’t write it down. Is it that super long number on the back of your router? Or did you change it to something more personal?

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Lucky for you, there’s a way to find all your Wi-Fi passwords in a single place — your computer.

Read more: Best Password Managers for 2022

As long as your Windows or Mac computer has connected to the network before, that Wi-Fi password is permanently stored in your settings. It may require a bit of digging on your part, but all of the passwords are there, saved, and ready to be shared with anyone who wants to connect to Wi-Fi.

Here’s how to find the passwords to all of the Wi-Fi networks you’ve ever connected to on MacOS and Windows. For more, discover 17 essential settings for customizing your MacBook or how to get the most out of Windows 11.

How to find Wi-Fi passwords in MacOS

Every password you’ve entered and saved on a Mac is stored in Keychain Access, the password management system for MacOS. And that includes Wi-Fi network passwords. 

To start, use the search feature to open the Keychain Access app and do the following:

1. Click on System under System Keychains in the sidebar.

2. Next, click on Passwords at the top of the window.

3. Find the Wi-Fi network you want the password for and double-click on it.

4. Finally, check the box next to Show password and enter your password when prompted.

Keychain Access app pop-up on MacBook

Find all your stored Wi-Fi passwords in the Keychain Access app on MacOS.


Screenshot by Nelson Aguilar/CNET

The password field will then show the password you used to log in to that Wi-Fi network. You can double-click in the password field to select the password and copy it to your clipboard,

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Wordle Top secret Phrase Match Has Taken the World wide web by Storm: Here’s How to Engage in

Wordle is an quick-to-study and entertaining-to-play on line activity that has garnered a good deal of consideration as most of us are nonetheless yet again limited to our houses due to the increasing Omicron situations and dipping temperatures. To participate in Wordle, you want to achieve a very simple process: guess a mystery 5-letter term in 6 tries. When the procedures of the recreation are uncomplicated, what makes it intriguing and hard is the actuality that a man or woman can only participate in the video game at the time a working day. Wordle can be only performed by means of a web site and won’t have to have you to obtain an app and indication in with any type of qualifications. This is all you will need to know about Wordle:

Wordle: Meet up with the maker

The recreation has been formulated by Josh Wardle, a Brooklyn-dependent software package engineer. The tale guiding the game’s advancement is as exciting as the sport. Wardle knew his partner, Palak Shah, liked online games, so he designed a guessing recreation for just the two of them. He named it “Wordle,” participating in on his last name. Wardle played it with Shah for a pair of months and shared it on his family’s WhatsApp team, wherever it promptly grew to become an obsession.

Wardle first designed a prototype of the game in 2013 but his mates were being unimpressed by his creation so he abandoned the notion. In 2020, on the other hand, he and Shah commenced killing time all through the pandemic by participating in Wordle. Wardle instructed the New York Instances in an job interview that limiting the probability to enjoy the activity only once for every working day “enforced a feeling of scarcity.” Wardle explained, “It’s something that encourages you to devote 3 minutes a day. And, which is it. Like, it isn’t going to want any extra of your time than that.”

Wordle: First Release

The developer released Wordle for the relaxation of the planet in Oct very last 12 months by building a focused web page for it.

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Here’s how much money Iowa City Council candidates raised, spent

Iowa City Mayor Bruce Teague outraised the other three candidates for City Council, garnering support from his constituents, family members, fellow elected officials and labor organizations ahead of Tuesday’s election.

The Iowa City Council money race is coming into focus as Election Day draws near. All four candidates submitted campaign finance disclosures to the Iowa Ethics and Campaign Disclosure Board’s web reporting system showing how much they raised and spent.

Teague brought in $7,842 from 100 total donors. Megan Alter, another candidate for one of the two at-large seats on the City Council, raised $6,915 from 102 donors. The third at-large candidate, Jason Glass, raised $3,865 from 50 donors. Shawn Harmsen, who is running unopposed for the District B seat, raised $6,259 from 106 donations.

“I think that people really wanted to ensure that the campaign that I was running for this community had some resources,” Teague said.

Like the other candidates, much of Teague’s money went toward expenses like mailers, campaign signs, office supplies and advertising.

Read more coverage on the Iowa City Council election:

Teague and Glass spend their own money on campaign

While Teague outraised the other candidates, Glass ended up spending more than all of his opponents combined.

In total, Glass spent $650 of the money he fundraised for his campaign, but also chose to finance campaign costs early on with $22,334 of his own cash. By comparison, Teague, Alter and Harmsen only spent $17,217 combined.

Jason Glass poses for a photo, Monday, May 3, 2021, in Iowa City, Iowa.

Glass said campaign startup costs like website creation and design, logo design and advertising, were costs he chose to take on himself. He said he didn’t focus on fundraising during his campaign, but rather reached out in-person and online to potential voters.

“I wanted to make sure I had quality materials and quality web presence and spent what I needed to in order to reasonably do that,” he said. “I am very pleased with the quality of my website, my materials, my Facebook and my logo and yard signs.”

Glass’s disclosure said he spent $6,397 on web fees and $4,627 on printing costs for mailers, among other campaign costs.

Glass

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