Intetics New Slide Website Sets the Standard of Excellence Across the Web Development Industry Winning 3 WebAwards 2021 In 3 Categories | News

NAPLES, Fla., Oct. 12, 2021 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — Not many website award programs applaud the individual achievements behind leading sites – but that’s exactly what the Web Marketing Association strives to do. Founded in 1997, the Association aims to set a high standard for the quality of website design and internet marketing – and it does so by hosting a yearly awards ceremony: the WebAwards.

The WebAwards recognizes the organizations and people responsible for developing the most innovative, beautiful, and effective websites on the Internet. This annual competition names the best-in-class sites across nearly 100 industries, ranging from biotechnology and construction to publishing and transportation.

How the Judging Works

The judging process is incredibly strict; we’ll walk you through it. Websites entered for the WebAwards 2021 were judged by an independent panel of experts in these 7 domains: Content, Design, Copywriting, Interactivity, Innovation, Technology, Ease-of-use for the target audience.

Overall, the Intetics slide website received a score of 64/70 points for the 7 criteria mentioned above. The average score in the competition was 54.1 points; not only did Intetics score well above the average, but we also passed the threshold to receive an Outstanding Website WebAward. And, even further, we ranked as #1 for each of our categories, thus earning the “Best” label!

Intetics Is an Awardee With 3 WebAwards 2021:

  • Best Computer Software Website
  • Best Application Service Provider Website
  • Best International Business Website.

This means that we ranked #1 in points for all these categories! We are happy to see that our innovative website redesign has been met with such positive reception. Intetics strives to provide clients and visitors with the best website experience possible – and we appreciate that our efforts have been recognized on an international scale.

Judges’ Comments

“I really like this site. Finally, a site with a simplified set of choices to not overwhelm visitors. 4 boxes on the home page! Click what you’re interested in, and get more info. Love it.”

“I like the puzzle graphics and images on the homepage.”

Intetics Website Development Team’s Comments

“Intetics’ new website is not about meeting all

Read More... Read More

Here’s how much money Iowa City Council candidates raised, spent

Iowa City Mayor Bruce Teague outraised the other three candidates for City Council, garnering support from his constituents, family members, fellow elected officials and labor organizations ahead of Tuesday’s election.

The Iowa City Council money race is coming into focus as Election Day draws near. All four candidates submitted campaign finance disclosures to the Iowa Ethics and Campaign Disclosure Board’s web reporting system showing how much they raised and spent.

Teague brought in $7,842 from 100 total donors. Megan Alter, another candidate for one of the two at-large seats on the City Council, raised $6,915 from 102 donors. The third at-large candidate, Jason Glass, raised $3,865 from 50 donors. Shawn Harmsen, who is running unopposed for the District B seat, raised $6,259 from 106 donations.

“I think that people really wanted to ensure that the campaign that I was running for this community had some resources,” Teague said.

Like the other candidates, much of Teague’s money went toward expenses like mailers, campaign signs, office supplies and advertising.

Read more coverage on the Iowa City Council election:

Teague and Glass spend their own money on campaign

While Teague outraised the other candidates, Glass ended up spending more than all of his opponents combined.

In total, Glass spent $650 of the money he fundraised for his campaign, but also chose to finance campaign costs early on with $22,334 of his own cash. By comparison, Teague, Alter and Harmsen only spent $17,217 combined.

Jason Glass poses for a photo, Monday, May 3, 2021, in Iowa City, Iowa.

Glass said campaign startup costs like website creation and design, logo design and advertising, were costs he chose to take on himself. He said he didn’t focus on fundraising during his campaign, but rather reached out in-person and online to potential voters.

“I wanted to make sure I had quality materials and quality web presence and spent what I needed to in order to reasonably do that,” he said. “I am very pleased with the quality of my website, my materials, my Facebook and my logo and yard signs.”

Glass’s disclosure said he spent $6,397 on web fees and $4,627 on printing costs for mailers, among other campaign costs.

Glass

Read More... Read More

Report, auditor’s online hub focus on Columbus tax incentive results

Want to know if a development in Franklin County received government tax breaks and whether it actually created the jobs, payroll and investment it promised?

There’s now a quick way to do that via a revamped website —  complete with interactive map — and a new report issued this month by Franklin County Auditor Michael Stinziano.

“Any member of the public can go out and look across the county at what tax incentives are being made in their community,” Stinziano said. “You can hover, look at a specific project and links to the local jurisdictions’ economic development folks. … We’re doing everything we can to hold folks accountable, that the promises made are being followed.”

Franklin County Auditor Michael Stinziano

As auditor, Stinziano heads the Tax Incentive Review Council (TIRC), a panel required under state law and includes officials from county, municipal or township authorities that grant tax exemptions, school boards affected by the agreements and others.

Cities, villages, townships and counties establish and approve tax-exemption agreements. TIRCs meet annually to review whether job creation, payroll, capital investment and other requirements in those deals are being met and to make recommendations whether incentives should be continued, modified or canceled.

In Franklin County, the reviews typically take place between May and August, in advance of a Sept. 1 deadline required under state law. Stinziano released his detailed report of the latest review this week.

More:Franklin County commissioners seek tax-sharing on three residential TIF districts

Abatements and other financial incentives used by public officials to lure commitments for new or expanding developments have prompted plenty of public debate.

Business groups and others generally support the tax exemptions, saying they’re necessary to compete with other areas working to attract economic development projects.

Nate Green, executive director of the Ohio Jobs Alliance, said in testimony this year to the Ohio House Ways and Means Committee that “property tax abatements can address Ohio’s high tax and property costs and drive not just job creation but also local tax revenues.”

Opponents counter that the tax breaks aren’t having their intended effect and instead take needed revenues away from schools

Read More... Read More

Full-stack web development bootcamps: Top programs and what to expect

Full-stack web development bootcamps prepare students for software engineering and development roles, along with various other computer science careers. Students often choose these programs for their condensed and focused nature, while employers value their emphasis on practical and relevant training. Bootcamps equip learners with applicable skills for many industries, including computer systems design, healthcare, and business and finance. 

The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects a 13% growth in employment for web developers between 2020 and 2030, 5% more than the average rate for all occupations. The fast growth results from an increasing demand for ecommerce, mobile device solutions, and enhanced communications with users. Full-stack developers also enjoy strong financial rewards, earning median annual wages of $77,200. 

What is a full-stack web development bootcamp?

A full-stack web development bootcamp provides training in both front- and back-end development. It also covers the most useful programming languages, web applications, and database architectures. 

Full-stack web development bootcamps vary in curriculum, length, and delivery format. They often teach learners design strategies, the common tools and environments, and web and application development strategies. Depending on the program, participants may complete bootcamps anywhere from 3-12 months. 

The available formats can differ considerably between programs, with some offering online, in-person, and hybrid study options, along with self-paced, part-time, and full-time schedules. They may run through colleges and universities or through independent organizations, which might also impact bootcamp accreditation. With so many options available, prospective students can usually find a bootcamp that suits their needs. 

Skills learned in a full-stack web development bootcamp

Participants can pick up plenty of skills in a full-stack web development bootcamp. They may develop skills in areas such as architecture, design, databases, and application development. 

Coding bootcamps often cover multiple programming languages, including HTML, JavaScript, Python, and CSS. Students learn when and how best to use these different scripting languages. In addition to learning how to code, bootcamp participants can pick up the following skills:

  • Project planning
  • Static and multi-page website development
  • API and application development
  • Database architecture
  • Testing
  • Mobile development
  • Storage creation and handling

What should I expect from the day-to-day in a

Read More... Read More

Gatsby makes a new approach to web development easy

Commentary: Jamstack’s modern approach to web development used to come with a caveat. With Gatsby 4, that caveat is gone.

Image: NDAB Creativity/Shutterstock

Must-read developer content

So much of what we consider enterprise software today was once derided as hobbyist toys. Though it’s not exclusively an open source phenomenon, it’s perhaps most obvious in open source projects like Linux or MySQL, which seem so inappropriate for serious enterprise use at first, then grow to become defaults for enterprise use. Something similar is happening in web development. 

SEE: The best programming languages to learn–and the worst (TechRepublic Premium)

Not so long ago, static site generator (SSG) frameworks like open source Gatsby were considered limited to simple applications like blogs or documentation sites. The problem was performance. SSGs were lightning fast because they rendered websites as files, but that speed broke down once a website moved beyond 10 to 1,000 pages and scaled to 10,000 or 100,000 pages. Suddenly the compilation process got really slow. 

Well, that was then, and this is now.

Projects like Gatsby increasingly challenge the notion that enterprises would need, much less want, a heavy-duty, all-in-one-but-master-of-none CMS like WordPress or Sitecore. Not when they can get best-of-breed: a headless CMS like Contentful as a back-end, API-driven content store; Stripe for payments, Gatsby for front-end presentation, etc. Indeed, this relatively new Jamstack approach may be setting a new standard for web development. Perhaps most importantly for developers, with Gatsby 4, there’s no longer a need to bet on SSG over server-side rendering (SSR). With Gatsby 4, you can have both.

Start small, go big

But that’s not where developers start. The world has lived in traditional CMSes for so long that developers will usually turn to something like WordPress for their work projects. WordPress, for example, is the CMS behind 39.6% of websites. When developers build for fun, however, they look to something like Gatsby, an open source framework for building websites with React. Gatsby is also the name of the company that does most of the development on the project, while also offering a cloud service to

Read More... Read More

Email Hosting vs. Web Hosting: What are the Differences Between the Two?

For many people new to hosting websites, web hosting and email hosting can seem the same. In today’s times, most businesses have to identify ways in which they can reach their existing and potential customers online. A website and emails are two ways of doing this efficiently. While they both are hosting services, they meet two completely different requirements of a business. Today, we will be comparing web hosting and Email Hosting services and highlight the differences between the two.

What is Web Hosting? 

For a website to be available online, it needs to be hosted on a webserver. As a site owner, you can either purchase a web server and house it on your premises or rent one from a hosting company. Many hosting companies offer different types of web hosting services based on the resources allotted to you. These plans allow you to store the website on a web server and make it accessible to online users.

What is Email Hosting?

Email or Webmail Hosting is about having a Professional Email server for your business. When you use a free email account like Yahoo or Gmail, the company runs and manages the email server. Hence, you don’t have much control over the privacy of your data or the security of the server. You can purchase a server and house it on your premises for emails – this is what is called private Email Hosting. Another option is purchasing a Business Email Hosting service. In this service, the host offers a range of benefits, including space and resources required to create multiple Business Email accounts for your business with optimum control.

The following video gives a quick peek into the meaning of Email Hosting – 

Difference between Web Hosting and Email Hosting

Here are some differences between the two services:

FeatureWeb HostingEmail Hosting
What is it?It is a hosting service that allows you to make your website accessible online.It is a hosting service that allows you to have professional email accounts (with your domain) and maximum control over the resources and accounts.
Who needs
Read More... Read More